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Is Death an Unfair Advantage?
Why is it that some artists of more or less equal talent are neglected and others praised and celebrated? Matthew Kangas explores a list to factors that go into an artist's historical reputation. More...


No Time to Sit Around: An Unexpected Memoriam
James Yood recalls his youthful experience of the climactic year 1968 a half century ago. This turned out to be his final short essay, as Yood tragically died of a heart attack on April 20th at age 65. More...


Artists with Disabilities
When Bay Area artist Katherine Sherwood was 44, when an artist is usually considered to be at mid-career, she lost the use of her dominant hand after suffering a stroke. She addressed the negative stereotyping of people with disabilities by creating clever and compelling paintings. More...


Lord by Giacometti and Vice Versa
The recently released film "Final Portrait" recounts James Lord's 1964 experience sitting for Alberto Giacometti. More...


Remembering Sandra Stone
Poet Sandra Stone was familiar to many artists and writers in and around Portland for more than her regular presence at art walks and host of studio salons. She wrote with insight, chutzpah and a first person voice that inhabited some of history's most interesting and idiosyncratic artists. More...


"All Art Was Once Contemporary"
That’s a mantra James Yood whispers to himself when his attention flags in the Rococo rooms of a museum. More...


The Power of Mark Making
Recent exhibitions by Robin Mitchell and Robert Walker demonstrated the continued viability of obsessive mark making. The accumulated effect of such accumulations transfers a heightened state of consciousness from artist to viewer. More...


Why Dennis Adrian Will be Missed
He was both loved and maligned. Dennis Adrian should be remembered as Chicago's best critic of his generation. More...


Two More Novels for Artists
Matthew Kangas offers another pair of novels that are a great read for all of us art types. More...


Hail to the Chief
DeWitt Cheng shares the affection so many hold for former President Obama; but not quite so much for the recently unveiled official portraits. More...


Art and Apocalypse
Images of annihilation have take on fresh urgency during the past year. Richard Speer calls our attention to a pair of exhibitions that suggest a silver lining that are not mere exercises in denial. More...


Ed Moses
The recent passing of Ed Moses reminded curator and critic David S. Rubin how 40 years ago Moses altered his grasp of West Coast art. More...


Having a Good Time?
The recent art world documentary "Blurred Lines," James Yood tells us, talks a lot about the art world, but no much about the art itself. More...


Two Novels for Artists
A one time English Lit teacher, Matthew Kangas combines that ongoing interest with his primary immersion in art writing here, with a pair of recommended 20th-century novels by Virginia Woolf and Robert Plunkett that will resonate with artists and art fans. More...


Art and Archetype at the Louvre Abu Dhabi
Jean Nouvel's design of the newly opened Louvre Abu Dhabi is simultaneously ancient in inspiration and space-age, low-slung and soaring, an inviting oasis of flowing water and rectilinear planes. More...


Refrigerated Art
Two installations, one by Mary Corse, another by Adrian Villar Rojas, employ refrigeration to interesting and divergent purpose. More than temperature, we get and enhanced sensory experience in Corse's "Cold Room"; and a vehicle for preservation of an epoch in Rojas' "Theater of disappearance. More...


“Annus Horribilis”
James Yood looks back as "a year of disaster or misfortune," the hopeful note for the art world being the current administration's indifference to it. A reproduction of Renoir's "Two Sisters" that Trump owns he refers to as an original serves as an apt metaphor. More...


Keeping an Eye Open
DeWitt Cheng introduces us to English essayist Julian Barnes' fluent, conversation commentary on art. More...


An Antidote for Our Woes
Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Rooms" are among the finest, and certainly most popular examples of the genre of interactive or immersive installation. In them you experience what it feels like to be at the core of infinity while seeing a latticework of lines moving in all directions. More...


Reversing the Gender Mirror
The reverberations of aesthetically driven feminism are apparent in the current discussion surrounding sexual harassment. More...

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